GEEK LOVE: A Book Review

Note: this book is not about comic con geeks falling in love.

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The best part about reading Geek Love is getting to tell people what it’s about. “I’m reading this strange book,” I’d say. Then they’d say “Oh? What’s it called?” “Geek Love,” I’d reply as I watch their noses crinkle. Then, I would clarify, “It’s about carnival freaks.”

But is it really fair to say that’s what Geek Love is about? Yes, the novel is about a husband and wife who decide to breed their own carnival freak show. Yes, it features a child with flippers for limbs, a set of conjoined twins, a “albino, hunchback dwarf,” and a child who appears to be a “norm” but is anything but. Yes, there is some squicky relationships and family love that goes far too far and unhealthily deep. Yes, Geek Love has the most bizarre and terrible characters you will meet, and yes, you will be uncomfortable and disgusted, and yes, it is everything it sounds like it will be, but it is also so much more. 

Geek Love is a disturbing novel about what it means to be “human” and the lengths people go to in order to feel special. Essentially, Geek Love is one of the most fundamentally human books I have ever read. Which means that, yes, you will find yourself relating to it more than you ever thought you could.

The novel is a reflection of both the desire and the disgust for difference that exists within us all. We love the absurd because it allows us to feel normal; but what the novel shows us is how we hate the normal because it makes us feel purposeless and useless.

What I loved most is how every single character is despicable and unlikeable in their own ways. They all do horrific things, things that no human should ever do, yet they seem to do it without a second guess. The choices they make are different than what most people would make because of the world they have created for themselves. Yet, these choices feel if not acceptable at least logical in their world. Perhaps the most disturbing part is how easy it is to love these characters, and how people who do disgusting things can be so close to your heart. I cried for these people. But what’s worst is that I forgave them, even when I knew what they did was wrong.

Everyone I talk about this book with says they want to read it. I will admit, this is probably because I absolutely adored it. The writing can be a bit dry at times, dense with words, and the plot is slow, but it’s this slowness that lets you sink into the world, lets you understand the carnivalesque, lets you feel almost… almost like you could be one of them. But you’re not. And the novel never lets you forget that.

I will warn you,  as I warn everyone I talk to this book with, it is highly disturbing and not for those with weak stomachs or hearts. There is a lot that is messed up, twisted to the point where you can’t believe people would do such things and yet… you understand their choices exactly.

Because, Geek Love shows us, we’re all monsters, and if we aren’t, we all crave to be one.

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